Galerie Project - Intricate Embroidered Landscapes by Ana Teresa Barboza

Intricate Embroidered Landscapes by Ana Teresa Barboza

Fine art in modern society often refers to paintings and sculpture – mediums that have long been at the top of the pile of the art world. But, as times shift and move with technology, mediums that were once considered “craft” are now merging with this archaic idea of fine art as painting.

Ana Teresa Barboza’s work is a great example of a craft technique that has evolved into high brow art. Her embroidered landscapes are intricately created using thread, crocheting and weaving techniques, but come together to form unusual landscapes that question both the currency of nature and our view of it.

Ana Teresa Barboza

This is Barboza’s ultimate aim with her pieces that depict the likes of wandering streams that meander outside the confines of her crochet wheel, or a waterfall that thunders down to the ground in a neatly woven twirl of blues and greens. “My aim is to create pieces of work that simulates experiments, aiming to reconstruct nature, teaching us to have a new and fresh look at it,” she says.

Emphasis is placed on the idea that we, as humans, have become disconnected from nature and its evolution that takes place all around us. It’s a fluid movement, often going unnoticed. Barboza brings this idea to the forefront of our minds by literally placing the moving parts of nature right in front of our eyes. And it has everything to do with the technique used. Barboza doesn’t simply use crochet and stitch because it looks pretty. “I use these techniques in order to make a connection between manual work and the processes of nature,” she admits.

Ana Teresa Barboza

She believes that crocheting and its natural flow brings us closer to nature and encourages us to consider it from a different perspective (one that’s removed from us as humans and our effect on the world around us). Her ultimate aim is to get the viewer to explore the very structures of nature that otherwise go unnoticed – the sharp bend of a river, or the frothy waves of the ocean. “The idea is to take part in the weave to continue what nature started,” she says, going on to explain that her technique draws connections between the manual handiwork involved in the creative process and the manual processes of nature that continue unaided by technology.

Ana Teresa Barboza

Barboza has been fascinated with sewing ever since she was twelve, when she watched her grandmother create beautiful embroideries from nothing. She now creates incredible landscapes from what started as a simple spool of thread.

What’s so incredible about Barboza’s pieces are their fluidness when it comes to the confines of a frame. Her landscapes aren’t simply retained by a crochet wheel. Instead, they are free to flow “off the page” entirely, sprawling down the wall, much like the wild characteristics of nature itself.

Ana Teresa Barboza

But, even when the yarn trails off the work, it is kept to a tight and neat order – just like the processes it imitates in nature. It’s almost as if Barboza is categorizing the colours of water and the lush green of forests, compartmentalizing them and breaking them down into something more manageable to take in.

“I’m interested in the different concepts one can arrive at by using clothing and embroidery as an artistic medium,” she says. And this is clearly evident in the intricate and beautiful landscapes that Barboza creates.

Enjoy the track “Staten Island Aquarium” by Map.Ache while viewing the gallery below.

Ana Teresa Barboza

Ana Teresa Barboza

Ana Teresa Barboza

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  1. Waue your work is awsome

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