Galerie Project - Fantastical Paper Flowers by Tiffanie Turner

Fantastical Paper Flowers by Tiffanie Turner

As summer comes into full swing in the northern hemisphere, it seems fitting to share the deliciously vibrant blooms of Tiffanie Turner.

Exploring the essence of nature and immortalising the eventual decay that real flowers go through, Turner’s pieces are both beautiful and surreal – despite their likeness to the real deal. Exquisite species like peonies are replicated in giant form, boasting bright colours and layers and layers of paper for added texture and depth.

Tiffanie Turner

But Turner isn’t about simply recreating immortal flowers. Instead, she adds a theatrical element to them that gives them a fantastical edge over their real-life counterparts. “Flowers are so amazing, so beautiful, so meaningful,” she says, going on to add that even though she adores creating flowers from paper, she’d always choose the real deal: “Why replicate something that is so perfect unless you can take it to another level?”

Turner’s love of paper harks back to her days as an architect, where she says she gained an interest in the mechanics behind how things are made and the use of repetitive but necessary elements. It was this and her love of flowers and botanical drawings that birthed her series of supersized flower sculptures. “The exploration of scale plays heavily into everything I do, and the organized chaos and rhythms in nature make the heads of flowers an excellent case study for me,” she says.

Tiffanie Turner

Inspiration comes in a variety of forms for Turner. At a base level, her mother’s love of quilting and doll making was a major influence, while her father’s minimalist aesthetic inspired the simplicity of her pieces. At an older age, Turner became infatuated with burlesque, which inspired her to start making the blooms to tack onto whimsical outfits. “I feel like performance is where it’s rooted,” she says of her flower series, “and that’s why they are so big in a way.”

Turner creates her pieces using crepe paper, which she loves for its ability to be flexible under different contexts. But despite the simplicity of the material, the pieces are a lot more complex, taking between 35 and 80 hours to create a single flower.

Tiffanie Turner

To begin the process, Turner papier-maches a balloon, which she then cuts away the top of before closing it with glue and stitches. Then it’s time to work on the petals. She draws inspiration from the flower’s respective stage (basically, when it’s about to go into full bloom), designing different paper shapes that reflect every layer of the flower, from the loose outer leaves to the tighter central bud.

Tiffanie Turner

Each cut-out petal shape is then stretched out to create a cup-like shape before they are attached to the papier mache base. Work starts from the centre and spirals outwards, reflecting the performance of a flower opening out into bloom.

But despite the systematic approach Turner seemingly takes, it’s a lot less rigid in reality: “To me, the process of creating one of these pieces is similar to that of a person sitting down to work at a loom or to sew a huge quilt together from small pieces of material, except that at some point metastasis occurs and the pieces become out of control,” she says.

Listen to the track “Nebula Variation” by Future/Past featured on Tresor‘s latest release.

Tiffanie Turner

Tiffanie Turner

Tiffanie Turner

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